Tag: Haddock

Legendary Dishes | Fiskibollur (fish fillet mince)

DENMARK | ICELAND | NORWAY | SWEDEN

Making a mince from fresh fish fillets is a very old tradition in northern Europe, particulary in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The recipe is essentially the same across Scandinavia, the modern Icelandic version owing more to the Danish tradition than Iceland’s own rich fish culture.

Cod and haddock are usually the choice of fish, but any fleshly white fish is suitable. Using salmon is a relatively young addition to the tradition.

In the countries that share a coastline with the Baltic sea, the mince is combined with cream and grits/manna croup and formed into breaded cakes, baked in the oven.

The mince is also made into a mousse or purée.

Eggs and milk add lightness to the mince when it is used to make fish balls.

Fiskefarse (poached fish balls)

This is the Norwegian version.

600 g fish fillets (cod, haddock, pollack, salmon, whiting), minced
150 g onions, chopped small
125 ml milk
2 eggs, beaten
75 g potato starch/baking flour or half and half
Salt, pinch
Pepper, pinch
Sunflower oil, for frying

Combine the fish and onions, stir in the eggs and milk, followed by the flour, starch and seasonings. Shape into balls. Preheat oven to 160°C. Fry in oil over a medium heat until golden brown. Place on a greased baking tray, bake in the oven for 15 minutes.

Fiskefars (poached fish balls) 

This is the standard Danish version.

2 litres fish stock
600g fish fillets (cod, haddock, hake, pollack, salmon, whiting)
200 ml milk
150 g onions
50 g potato starch
1 egg
1 egg white
15 ml sunflower oil
10 g dill, for garnish
1 tsp Danish curry powder 
Salt, pinch
Pepper, pinch
4 lemons, quartered

Use the large blade in a food processor to blend the fish and onions. Transfer mixture into a large bowl, combine with the egg, flour, milk and oil. Fold in the egg white. Season with curry powder, salt and pepper. Shape into walnut sized balls. Using a spoon drop into a large pot of boiling fish stock, turn heat to low. When the balls float to the surface they are ready. Serve with lemon wedges, garnish with dill.

LEGENDARY DISHES


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Legendary Dishes | Cullen Skink (smoked haddock and potato soup)

SCOTLAND

Named for the town of Cullen on the Moray Firth east of Inverness in Scotland, this thick soup gets its reputation from locally smoked Finnan haddock.

Finnan haddock has a distinctive flavour, a consequence of the green wood and earthy peat used to smoke the fish.

The local tradition of combing the haddock with milk, onions and potatoes complimented the wider Atlantic tradition that produced chowder. This is one of those dishes that can be made with shop bought smoked haddock but it is a thousand times better with the Finnan variety.

400 ml milk
400 g potatoes, peeled, cut small, boiled, mashed with 15 g butter
400 g smoked haddock
250 g onions
50 ml concentrated fish stock (optional)
15 g butter (optional)
1 bay leaf
Black pepper, pinch
Salt, pinch
Water, for poaching

Put the haddock in a shallow pan, add onions and bay leaf and sufficient water to cover the fish, bring to a low boil and poach for five minutes. Remove the fish and carefully break it into flakes, set aside. If using whole haddock, place the bones along with the skin back in the poaching water, simmer for 20 minutes, then strain the liquid into a clean pot. Alternatively use a concentrated fish stock. Add milk to the stock, bring to a simmer, add the mashed potatoes and heat gently, until the potato has dissolved into a creamy soup, not too thick. If thin reduce for several minutes. Adding flakes of butter is optional. Arrange the haddock in equal amounts in soup bowls, pour over the hot stock, season and serve.

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Legendary Dishes | Fish and Chips

ENGLAND IRELAND SCOTLAND WALES

FishandChips

Until the concern about fish stocks in the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean prompted conservation measures, the fish that went with chips was invariably big fleshly cod.

Fish and chips are still made with cod, although it is more likely the fish will be coley, dogfish, haddock, hake, plaice, pollack, skate or whiting.

Less common is a batter made with beer, despite the difference it makes to the flavour of the crispy coating on the fish.

This is the recipe and method for traditional fish and chips made with beer batter.

 

1 litre sunflower oil
BelgianBeef
Belgian Beer
750 g potatoes, chipped
700 g fish fillets
300 ml beer/carbonated water
200 g flour
Baking powder, pinch
Salt, pinch

 

Soak chips for 30 minutes before frying to remove starch.

Heat a deep frier or deep saucepan filled with oil to 190°C.

Deep fry for seven minutes, until al dente. Remove to a large plate covered with absorbent kitchen paper.

Sieve flour into a large bowl, add baking powder, salt and beer. Whisk into a lump-free batter. Leave to rest.

Bring heat back up to 190°C.

Deep fry chips until they are golden and crisp. Drain and keep warm.

Bring heat up to 190°C.

Batter fish, deep fry until the batter is golden.

Place on kitchen paper, then serve with the chips.

LEGENDARY DISHES


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